Current ExhibitionsPast Exhibitions

Fleeting Moments. Drawings by Rodin
Exhibition at the Staten Museum for Kunst, Copenhagen, 22 September 2016 – 15 January 2017 11/3/2016

Fleeting moments - Danemark.png
Fleeting Moments - National Gallery of Danemark
This exhibition takes you to the very core of the work of French sculptor Auguste Rodin: his drawings. Drawings allowed Rodin to explore the human form freely and spontaneously before expressing what he saw and learned in clay and stone.

It is very simple. My drawings are the key to my work.

The French artist Auguste Rodin (1840–1917) is one of the greatest masters in art history. He is best known for his dramatic, pathos-filled sculptures, which he created from the mid-nineteenth century onwards – works that revolutionised the art of sculpture. But Rodin was also a draughtsman. In fact he produced more than 10,000 drawings, and they occupy a key position in the evolution and method of his art.

The drawings enabled him to experiment more freely and spontaneously with the human form than the large, three-dimensional sculptures allowed. He transferred the lessons learned through these drawings to his work with clay and stone. Hence we can say, as Rodin himself did, that his drawings are the key to his art.

The exhibition, which is created in collaboration with Musée Rodin in Paris, addresses the forces and impulses at play in these drawings, and looks at the things that make Rodin’s depictions of the human form so groundbreaking.

Fleeting Moments. Drawings by Rodin
Exhibition at the Staten Museum for Kunst, Copenhagen, 22 September 2016 – 15 January 2017 11/3/2016

Fleeting moments - Danemark.png
Fleeting Moments - National Gallery of Danemark
This exhibition takes you to the very core of the work of French sculptor Auguste Rodin: his drawings. Drawings allowed Rodin to explore the human form freely and spontaneously before expressing what he saw and learned in clay and stone.

It is very simple. My drawings are the key to my work.

The French artist Auguste Rodin (1840–1917) is one of the greatest masters in art history. He is best known for his dramatic, pathos-filled sculptures, which he created from the mid-nineteenth century onwards – works that revolutionised the art of sculpture. But Rodin was also a draughtsman. In fact he produced more than 10,000 drawings, and they occupy a key position in the evolution and method of his art.

The drawings enabled him to experiment more freely and spontaneously with the human form than the large, three-dimensional sculptures allowed. He transferred the lessons learned through these drawings to his work with clay and stone. Hence we can say, as Rodin himself did, that his drawings are the key to his art.

The exhibition, which is created in collaboration with Musée Rodin in Paris, addresses the forces and impulses at play in these drawings, and looks at the things that make Rodin’s depictions of the human form so groundbreaking.

Between Sculpture and Photography
Exhibition at the Rodin Museum, April 12, 2016 - July 17, 2016 4/12/2016

penone_002_trappole_di_luce_c1012_diacarchivio_penone.jpg
Responding to the singular place of photography in Auguste Rodin’s work, and following on from the Mapplethorpe Rodin exhibition in 2014, the Musée Rodin continues to explore the fruitful relationship between sculpture and photography.
Based on an idea by Michael Frizot, a photography historian, this exhibition is an invitation to look at eight artists from the second half of the 20th century who work directly with sculpture and photography. For all of them, John Chamberlain (1927-2011), Cy Twombly (1928-2011), Dieter Appelt (born 1935), Markus Raetz (born 1941), Mac Adams (born 1943), Gordon Matta-Clark (1943-1978), Richard Long (born 1945) and Giuseppe Penone (born 1947), sculpture and photography are interlinked and have a shared resonance.